Patrick Robinson

Kitson Arts Alliance co-founder, creative director and board president Patrick Robinson, an antiques broker and dealer, is using his cell phone camera to create an unusual art form.

The owner of Robinson Group International, which offers great collectibles online, he enjoys taking cell phone photos of the vintage and antique objects that he likes – and he doesn’t use his phone’s app to manipulate his photos, for example by cropping, in any way. “Any time I’m out and see an image that I can frame right, I take a photo. I just shoot it straightaway” on his Samsung 7 phone. “I didn’t realize (then) that the art came in framing (the subject) before you shoot it.”

Fellow KAA member Betsy Green suggested that he frame his images for display and sale. Another friend, Jack Donnelly, has encouraged him to start a cell phone camera-only group in the KAA.

“When I was a kid, about 10 or 11 years old, I would take pictures of different antiques that I found with an old Polaroid. I wasn’t framing shots for artistic reasons, just things I found,” he said. “I’d take pictures of artifacts, bottles and other things before taking them to a flea market to sell.” As he shoots different things with vintage appeal, he tries to frame the shot in a way that someone else might enjoy, he added. A few are displayed at the Kitson Gallery at Pen Corners on the corner of Bridge and Tioga streets in Tunkhannock.

He particularly enjoys children’s antiques and collectibles, and baseball cards and memorabilia.

One of Patrick’s favorites is antique German tin pull toys made during the mid-late 1800’s. “Every now and then you still find that person who inherited them from grandparents, then stored them in the attic after they were done with them. Many of these toys are still in great shape.

Sometimes poking through old abandoned houses (of course with the owners’ permission) can yield unusual treasures. Searching one home uncovered particular treasures – pieces of old bisque dolls. Heads, hands and feet – and anything that rodents hadn’t already eaten – with the names Kestner and Simon Halbig. After showing them to a doll restoration expert near Clarks Summit, he sold them to her for $800. A shed on the same property contained an old metal tricycle with a wooden seat, possibly turn of the century, and a handful of hand-painted lead soldiers, possibly from the World War II era.

Look for Patrick’s Antiques & Collectibles column in each issue of the North Branch Art Trail’s quarterly publication, The NBat Guide.

BIO

The owner of Robinson Group International, which offers great collectibles online, he enjoys taking cell phone photos of the vintage and antique objects that he likes – and he doesn’t use his phone’s app to manipulate his photos, for example by cropping, in any way. “Any time I’m out and see an image that I can frame right, I take a photo. I just shoot it straightaway” on his Samsung 7 phone. “I didn’t realize (then) that the art came in framing (the subject) before you shoot it.”

Fellow KAA member Betsy Green suggested that he frame his images for display and sale. Another friend, Jack Donnelly, has encouraged him to start a cell phone camera-only group in the KAA.

“When I was a kid, about 10 or 11 years old, I would take pictures of different antiques that I found with an old Polaroid. I wasn’t framing shots for artistic reasons, just things I found,” he said. “I’d take pictures of artifacts, bottles and other things before taking them to a flea market to sell.” As he shoots different things with vintage appeal, he tries to frame the shot in a way that someone else might enjoy, he added. A few are displayed at the Kitson Gallery at Pen Corners on the corner of Bridge and Tioga streets in Tunkhannock.

He particularly enjoys children’s antiques and collectibles, and baseball cards and memorabilia.

One of Patrick’s favorites is antique German tin pull toys made during the mid-late 1800’s. “Every now and then you still find that person who inherited them from grandparents, then stored them in the attic after they were done with them. Many of these toys are still in great shape.

Sometimes poking through old abandoned houses (of course with the owners’ permission) can yield unusual treasures. Searching one home uncovered particular treasures – pieces of old bisque dolls. Heads, hands and feet – and anything that rodents hadn’t already eaten – with the names Kestner and Simon Halbig. After showing them to a doll restoration expert near Clarks Summit, he sold them to her for $800. A shed on the same property contained an old metal tricycle with a wooden seat, possibly turn of the century, and a handful of hand-painted lead soldiers, possibly from the World War II era.

Look for Patrick’s Antiques & Collectibles column in each issue of the North Branch Art Trail’s quarterly publication, The NBat Guide.