Down on the Farm

Rain, Rain, Go Away

by Gerald & Tina Carlin

Do you remember the old children’s tune, “Rain, rain, go away, come again another day?” That tune is being sung repetitively by farmers all across the United States. The unseasonably rainy weather is taking its toll. Farmers are not able to plant this year’s crops, because their fields are too wet, totally flooded, or they are planting very late.

According to RFD-TV News, farmers in the Midwest are packing up their household items and leaving the farms. If they stay on the farm, the bank will end up calling their notes because of lack of income from the farm families to pay off their debt. There is no flood relief available from the Government to help regain these losses. The losses are incredible when you think about it. Hundreds of thousands, if not close to a million cattle, mostly calves, have lost their lives because the farmers were not able to get them somewhere safe because the flood water came up so fast. Hundreds of thousands of acres of cropland lay unplanted when the flood water came so fast that it washed away the fertile top soil. It is hard to imagine how they are ever going to recover.

There seems to be no official concern, however; after all we are in a “global economy” so we can import our way out of a crisis if need be. If we lose more farmers, it’s no big deal. Many officials consider this “progress” and believe that we can always get more immigrant labor to do farm work – “work that Americans don’t want to do.”

Here in the northeastern part of Pennsylvania, we are facing our own hardships. With all of the rain that our area has received the last couple of months we were delayed with planting our crops and getting on our hayfields. There was an old saying that corn should be “knee high by the 4th of July.” Some farmers will not even be able to plant their corn crop this year because the corn has a long growing time until maturity. Many acres of farmland lay bare because the ground was too wet. Now the weather pattern has changed. Will there be enough rain for the late crops to grow? This is the stark reality of farming.

What does this all mean for you the consumer? Most of the crops that are going unplanted are corn, wheat, oats, barley, millet, other grains, and even produce. These are very important for our food supply. High grain prices are likely this coming fall and winter. This will make it even more difficult for dairy farmers and livestock farmers, many of whom already have low-quality forage because of the wet spring and early summer.

How the weather-related crop challenges will affect supply and price in the grocery store remains to be seen. Some types of produce may be in short supply or, depending on the item, may be nonexistent. If we are lacking in supply, our multi-national corporations will just import the supply they need from other countries, raising the question, “What are their growing practices and what chemicals are they spraying their fields with?”

The best way to get the produce and meat you need is to visit your local farmers markets. There are several in most counties in our area. Get to know your farmer. Be understanding, realize that farmers who grow what they sell face many challenges from weather, pests, labor shortages, etc. Because of this, they may not have everything that is normally in season, all of the time. Be grateful for what they do offer. Support your local communities by buying local. It’s what good food should be.

We welcome your questions and comments.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHORS:

Gerald & Tina Carlin are the owner/operators of Carlin Farm and the 4 Seasons Farm Market. The 4 Seasons Farm Market (located on the farm at 3064 SR 3005, Meshoppen, PA 18630) is open year-round. Call 570-833-4592 for hours & directions.

Antiques & Collectibles

Carousel Antiques

by Patrick K. Robinson

My journey has taken me to Southern PA (Lewisburg, Bucks County area) and into Delaware. This story again goes back to my early days of driving as a teenager but now traveling out further.

Why so far you ask? Since being a toy collector and collector of other children-related things like sports cards and comics, I really ended up liking certain carnival collectibles, circus-related items, and so forth. The larger carousel figures were right in line with all of these other items for me. I was traveling to these southern areas of PA on some hot leads to potentially see a couple carousel figures, meeting with a few buyers I worked with that I would broker items for – items that they purchased from entire estates or deaccession sales from different museums.

The deaccession sales were rather interesting because they would be officially removing listed holdings from museums, or an art gallery, typically to sell them in order to raise funds. So not only is it exciting to get to see all kinds of items from multi-million dollar estates, some ten million or more, but to again learn from some of these buyers. I will admit too that it was exciting to see some of these carousels that were totally carved with so much detail and hand painted in very beautiful colors.

From the golden age of carousels, this 1914 hand-carved, hand-painted carousel horse is from the
Herschell-Spillman carousel at Golden Gate Park (copywrite, Aaron Shepard, via carousel.org).

It, too, brought back some great memories of riding on these older carousel creations as a child. I remember how I felt as a young boy riding the carousels at Knoebels Park and also at Hansen’s Park at Harvey’s Lake, PA.

We all arrive at this old factory-type building and you could just smell the old parks that you’ve been to, all stored and shut up inside this place, and off in the corner I could see the image of a covered-up horse. I again thought of Hansen’s Park and trying to grab the brass ring in order to get a free ride. If you grabbed a plastic one it didn’t count, although there never seemed to be a loser as the guy operating this chain-driven carousel always had candy for the plastic ring holders.

After uncovering the horse, I right away saw this one was a little more of a folk art piece, as it was less detailed in its carving, and was a brown painted piece with some color but not a lot, but I will have to say, still very cool. Just being in this building with all this history was cool!

You will notice a picture in this article of a folk art-style brown horse and this was kind of similar to the one I brokered all those years ago, being 17 or 18 years old at the time. The simpler type horse like the brown one was actually made with these parallel legs that were made to come apart easier as to travel them from county fair to fair or to a carnival.

Produced for Armitage Herschell, this simple brown carousel horse is a 1912 C.W. Parker county fair carousel from Fireman’s Park in Brenham, Texas (copywrite, Rebecca Nance, via carousels.org).

The brownish more simple horse in the photo is a 1912 C.W. Parker county fair carousel at Fireman’s Park in Brenham, Texas. It was produced for Armitage Herschell and was probably on a track machine (copywrite, Rebecca Nance, via carousels.org). The other carousel horse is certainly one I would dream of brokering. It is from the golden age of carousels (roughly 1890 to 1920’s), was hand carved in great detail and hand painted. Dated 1914, it is from the Herschell-Spillman carousel at Golden Gate Park (copywrite, Aaron Shepard, via carousel.org).

All being said, the folk art style horse still brought thousands, just not five figures like the more detailed golden age example. The one I had discovered was more from the 1940s or 1950’s, but still desirable because in the 1980’s carousel figures of all kinds were a hot commodity. The other interesting point while on this trip, I met a couple of very wealthy buyers that were on the hunt to buy an entire carousel set up to restore and save from being separated and sold as individual pieces. Here we are talking hundreds of thousands of dollars.

A little more interesting information for you, the name carousel derives from carosello, an Italian word meaning little war. Little war was said to be a medieval game Turkish soldiers would play on horseback. At some point it is said that English and German soldiers used to train the same way to practice spearing with their lances. Remember earlier in this article that I mentioned the fun we had grabbing the brass ring on the carousel at Hansen’s Park? Well that came from young boys training with spearing techniques by practicing spearing through brass rings as target practice.

To continue with the deal I was brokering in Southern PA: I arranged for the sale and delivery of the Southern PA carousel folk art style horse to a buyer in New England, and all went well. Both parties were happy and I had the pleasure of closing another deal and able to relive the feelings of these great creations in carousel history and, most importantly, the great energy of saving a piece of history. I certainly dream of the day I get to broker a true Golden Age carousel figure from the 1800’s for five figures.

I was motivated to share this story because, along with this, we at Kitson Arts Alliance have the honor of working with one of our member artists, Jennifer Sause Brennan, who sculpts carousel figures that are mounted on poles just like a figure on a carousel, and the pole is put into a beautiful wood base that comes from her own property. The materials she sculpts with are made up of natural fibers for strength as well as a clay slip kind of material along with other ingredients, all natural, and then mixed in a mixer. What comes next is true artisan creativity as you can see by the pictures of her horse, tiger and even Dumbo!

Jennifer forms these amazing works of art all by hand and then skillfully hand paints each one. I will say each one is different from the next, so when you get one, you will never see the same one anywhere else. If you’d like to purchase one, they are currently on display and for sale at the Kitson Gallery in Tunkhannock, PA. The cost is $110.00 each, and they are roughly 16 inches tall. The Kitson Gallery is open from 11am to 7pm on Saturdays and Fourth Fridays all year round from 3pm to 8pm. You may also call me at 570-499-5484 for an appointment anytime.

You will also get to see not only carousel figures but many other awesome forms and creations of Jennifer’s ranging from $20.00 all the way up to the previously-mentioned $110.00 and every price in between, so owning your own piece of great art doesn’t have to be costly.

The Kitson Gallery will also have Jennifer Sause Brennan’s creations during the North Branch Art Trail’s Route 6 Open House Gallery Tour on November 8, 9, and 10 from 11 am to 7 pm each day.

Thank you for spending this time with me and I wish you happy art, antique, collectible and rarity hunting. I would also love to hear your story of collecting. You know the how, what, when, where, and why of your collection. Please email your information to me at rgroup@emcs.net. Thank you again.

There is still a wealth of information to learn about carousel antiques, so we recommend you go check out carousel.org.

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Patrick K. Robinson is a life-long collector (since the ripe old age of nine), antiques specialist, and kid-at-heart entrepreneur who is passionate about hearing YOUR stories about the items YOU collect, the cherished antique YOU’VE acquired, the family heirloom YOU’D like to know more about. Co-founder & Creative Director of the Kitson Arts Alliance and owner of Robinson Group International (offering great collectibles online at HotGavel.com) and Tunkhannock’s Kitson Gallery at Pen Corners, Patrick invites kids of all ages (7 to 77 and beyond) to share your story by contacting him at rgroup@emcs.net or by visiting his Facebook page, Kitson Gallery.

Hops & Vines

Laura’s Little Corner at Hops & Vine

by Laura Yale

As I set forth on my latest adventure, the crispness of the air, the crunch of the grass below my feet, and the blustery north wind are all tell-tale signs that fall is upon us and soon will be beckoning the call of old man winter. Just as seasons change and the leaves become more vibrant with hues of yellow, red, and orange, the local hops have all been harvested and our local wineries and breweries have been busy developing innovative blends and entertainment that will extend keeping us warm and cozy throughout the chillier months.

Enjoy your holidays and plan to stop for all the wonderful get-togethers our local wine and beer purveyors offer. Always a fabulous time! Here’s me headed to one of their Christmas sweater contests.

Infusions of pumpkin spice, apple, and cranberry are back to center stage this time of year with our regional wine and beer purveyors. Bonfires on site and wine tastings off premises are popping up, and festivals offering sampling of the ingenious local libations are in full swing. Not to mention mulled concoctions that round out their selections that not only tantalize our taste buds but our senses with their spectacular aromas.

All of these wonderful additions give consumers even more variety than ever before. The colder months also give the producers a chance to reap some of the harvest. All their hard work and perseverance can pay off with the start of industry award competitions and by the increase in sales of the holidays.

This is a time that the both brewers and wineries can add to their forte by showcasing special festive blends that capture the spirit of the season. They offer guests some pizzazz with indoor activities such as trivia and ugly sweater Christmas parties, and many play host to gala events featuring local entertainment that give folks a chance to kick back and relax a wee bit from all the hustle and bustle and pick up some wonderful gifts. Truly a winning combination of buyer and seller!

My driveway view as I start out on the wine and brewery trail to visit my friends. As the saying goes, “The road to a friend’s is never long” and I surely enjoy heading out to an adventure!

Just because the grape leaves are wilting and they and the hops are going dormant, there is still a lot going on behind the scenes. Production is still full steam ahead and like the saying goes, “Rome wasn’t built in a day.” Neither are wine and beer. While we are worrying about what gifts to give, what sweaters to wear, and what holiday meals to prep, the vintners and brewers are busy not only making their regular selections but calculating what the next big taste in the industry will be and how to create it – figuring in the fermentation process and getting it to the market while it is still trending. Not an easy task with combating issues and the ever-changing palates of consumers.

All of this keeps those in the industry on their toes so to speak. One of the crucial and combative issues that I have come across in my journey visiting local wineries and breweries is the talk of the spotted lantern fly. This pesky bug is a plant hopper that is indigenous to China, Vietnam, and Eastern Asia and has been in our state as of 2014. First discovered in Berks County, most likely by an egg sac coming over attached to pallet or packing material, this insect is an insatiable feeder on such economically-important crops as grapevines, hops, fruit trees, ornamentals, and hardwoods and deadens them by feeding, excreting, and causing molding so they die.

Just like the emerald ash bore, it is spread by people moving wood, stones, or outdoor items that the spotted lantern flies’ eggs are on. Its containment and eradication are a main priority so much so that even this month Penn State University acquired a $7.3 million dollar four-year grant from the USDA to do extensive research and learn more facts about the habits of the insect and to help in the fight. As the war is raged on the spotted lantern fly, our local grape and hops growers remain vigil to protect their crops. It is definitely a serious key element which unfortunately be part of our conversations for years to come.

On a lighter note, as I return to my little corner at Hops and Vine, I will leave you all with an original Irish quote of my own. “May the chill in the air bring more warmth to your heart and generosity to your soul.” Wishing you all the best on your personal adventures on our local wine and brewery trails. Until we meet again, Cheers my friends!

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Laura Yale and her husband, Dan, are the long-time owners of The Fireplace Restaurant, 6157 US-6, Tunkhannock, PA 18657. The restaurant proudly features a variety of local wines & beers, the artwork of local artists throughout, and locally-sourced foods as much as possible. The Fireplace Restaurant is open 11am-10pm daily, until 11pm Fridays and Saturdays.

Keystone Community Resources, 55 Year Anniversary

Senator Blake presented a Citation for 55 year Anniversary to President and CEO of Keystone Community Resources (KCR) at Grand Opening-Ribbon Cutting Family Picnic Celebration.

KCR recently had a Grand Opening and Family Picnic at their newest Adult Day Program at 628 Genet Street in Scranton. Neighbors, community leaders, Senator Blake, along with KCR individuals they support and the families. KCR purchased the former St. Francis of Assisi Church and Rectory in 2016. Over the last few years, KCR has renovated this beautiful property while keeping the integrity of the building. KCR was excited to announce this expansion of Keystone as one of the many fully-licensed Day Program for individuals with Autism and Developmental Disabilities. At this specific location, we offer multiple sensory rooms, art, cooking classes, along with multiple other opportunities outside of the building such as community activities and volunteering. Programming is based on the individual’s choice and opportunities. Senator John Blake presented a citation for Keystone Community Resources 55 year Anniversary, to our President and CEO Laura Brown-Yadlosky at the KCR Genet Street Grand Opening. KCR is Celebrating 55 years of Caring, since 1964.

Pictured left to right: In attendance at the Ribbon Cutting was Brianna Florovito, Workforce & Entrepreneurial Development Specialist at the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce; MaryAnn Colbert, Director, Intellectual Disability Services Lackawanna-Susquehanna Counties BHIDEI Programs; Laura Brown-Yadlosky, KCR President and CEO; J. Jennifer Wolf, KCR Genet St. Program Coordinator; Dawn Loven, KCR Genet St. Program Manager; Donna Perechinsky, KCR Accounting Coordinator and Board Member of KCR; and Stan Chotkowski, Vice President of Programs and Services of KCR.

 

Keystone Community Resources First Friday Open Reception

 

First Friday Open Reception: Artists on Exhibit are Cathy Arvonio and Melissa Anowai

ArtWorks Gallery & Studio, 236 Penn Avenue, Scranton

November 1, 2019 – 6 to 9 p.m.

 

The exhibition entitled “Perspectives” features the works of two highly-accomplished artists who have chosen nature as subject matter yet differ in their styles, mediums, and vision – and, ultimately, perspective – which creates a dramatic juxtaposition generating dynamism to the collection’s presentation.

Cathy Arvonio showcases her dedication and love for oil painting, a highly-specialized and difficult medium, in which she has mastered and excels in the difficult artistic process. The minute detail Cathy achieves is her hallmark of style and expertise. Cathy’s genre is realism, primarily still life and landscapes. She brings a fresh importance to all that surround us – familiar scenes, places and objects – while basking in the light of beauty.

Cathy feels the importance of nature in our lives. “I always, always find beauty in everything I paint,” she says. “There’s beauty all around us and in every one of us, and it is a gift to ‘see’ it and to paint it. From that I take, and put it all onto my canvas. Throughout the years, I learned to be freer with my creations and have put more of myself into the painting, along with recreating the picture I see. One of my favorite artist’s quotes… ‘Art does not reproduce what we see. It makes us see.’ – Paul Klee.”

For Melissa Anowai, her expressionist style using acrylic medium, is rooted in the metaphysical, creating an incandescent beauty, which transcends the traditional depiction of Nature life subjects. She chooses to explore those creatures that elude us so often, both of the avian and entomological species. Melissa focuses on the cycles of life, the transitory and ephemeral precious seasons of the natural world suspending them in a timeless beauty revealing dignity and integrity, inherent in each of her subjects, imbued with honor and soulful light. Melissa brings forth an extraordinary vision of our world and asks questions of us through her art.

“As an artist,” states Melissa, “I have always felt compelled to depict all aspects of the natural world and view all life as beautiful and worthy of celebration. I also feel that the natural world should be cherished both in life and in solemnity of death. There is a reverence that I try to create in each piece, which is a reflection of my love and respect for nature.”

Keystone Community Resources, ArtWorks New Location

Keystone Community Resources (KCR) hosted the ArtWorks Gallery & Studios ribbon-cutting at 236 Penn Ave., Scranton on Sept. 6. Pictured, left to right, are Robert Durkin, Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce president; Tom Welby, chief of staff for State Rep. Marty Flynn; Laura Brown-Yadlosky, president and CEO of KCR, Jay Blakesberg, San Francisco-based photographer; Kaitlin Harrison, ArtWorks Program Coordinator; Mary Ann Colbert, director of Intellectual disability services of the Lackawanna-Susquehanna counties BHIDEI program; Donna Perchinsky, accounting coordinator and board member of KCR; Stan Chotkowski, KCR vice president of programs and services; State Rep. Kyle Mullins; and Chris Calvey, arts and culture department coordinator of Lackawanna County.

 

In September, the ArtWorks Gallery & Studio moved into a larger downtown Scranton location. The new building, located at 236 Penn Avenue, has three times the gallery space and features multiple studios for room to grow. The ArtWorks team is planning a new exclusive pottery studio that boasts a kiln for firing clay works to create one-of-a-kind pottery items. Planned new programs also include print making, silk screening, lynol cuts, digital studio, drawing, and painting.

A program of Keystone Community Resources, ArtWorks is an alternative to traditional day service for individuals with Autism and Intellectual Disabilities. It is a creative environment with an individual based schedule suited to a person’s needs or skill level. We are looking to integrate community classes and eventually extend the hours of operation.

The ArtWorks Gallery & Studio also has new art classes at night for adults, teens and children. Call 570-207-1815 today about fees and registration.

 

Endless Mountains Heritage Region, Dennis Symposium

EMHR Director Serves as Keynote Speaker at Dennis Farm Event

By Rick Hiduk

 

Endless Mountains Heritage Region (EMHR) executive director Cain Chamberlin was the keynote speaker at the Dennis Farm Charitable Land Trust (DFCLT) Symposium, which was held recently at Keystone College in La Plume. The Dennis Farm Historic Site, located in Brooklyn Township, Susquehanna County was home to a prominent free African-American family who made an indelible mark on local and national history.

Cain Chamberlin

DFCLT president Denise Dennis selected Chamberlin as the first “local” keynote speaker in the Symposium’s seven years, she explained, because of the early and ongoing relationship between the EMHR, which was founded in 1998 and the DFCLT, which was initiated in 2001. The EMHR’s facilitation of funding supplied by PA DCNR allowed for the development of a special purposes study and master site plan that have formally encapsulated the story and the Dennis family and their vision for the future of the property.

In 2016, Denise worked with the EMHR again for inclusion of the Dennis Farm on the revamped Susquehanna County Heritage Attractions sign and map. That project garnered the Dennis Farm its first street address – 7799 Creek Road, Kingsley – and a much-deserved position among the county’s other historic sites, few of which date as far back as the 1793 arrival and settlement of Revolutionary War veteran Prince Perkins, who would later marry into the Perkins family of Dimock.

This past year, the EMHR helped to fund the design, production and installation of 10 interpretive panels that have been situated upon the 153-acre spread. After the symposium, dozens of guests, many making the trip from the Philadelphia area for the first time, were shuttled to the farm for guided tours by Dennis family and DFCLT members and docents from Keystone College. The new signs and a monument were unveiled in the course of their visit.

Mountain View High School gifted teacher Charleene Martens presents a jar of syrup to Denise Dennis (center) that was produced from sap collected from centuries-old maple trees on the Dennis Farm by Mountain View students. Joining them are (from left) Dennis family member Lonnie Moore III, Mountain View superintendent Karen Voigt and special education teacher Brion Stone, Dennis family member Darryl Gore, Dennis Farm Charitable Land Trust board member Wade Catts, and program emcee George Stark of Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation.

Seventeen years and $50,000 into their partnership, EMHR board members met the Dennis family in June for a tour of the site, delighting in Denise’s ability to recall such minute details of nine generations of Perkins and Dennis ancestors and relatives and their specific contributions to local history. “It’s easy to see how passionate they all are about their story,” Chamberlin remarked. “We are so fortunate to have places like the Dennis Farm in our region. It is a true gem of the Endless Mountains.”

“Having been asked by Denise to be the keynote speaker for the event was particularly humbling and a true highlight of my time with the Heritage Region thus far,” said Chamberlin. “Because of its agricultural connection. Fully documented family history, and association with early African American life and American conflicts dating back to the French and Indian War, the historical and cultural significance of the Dennis Farm is almost immeasurable.”

Chamberlin applauded the Dennis family’s passion for historical preservation and their desire to learn all they can about their lineage as truly inspiring and exemplary of what the EMHR looks for in a heritage partner.

The EMHR serves and promotes historical and agriculture initiatives in Bradford, Sullivan, Susquehanna and Wyoming counties.

Endless Mountains Heritage Region, Annual Meeting

Heritage Region Celebrates Year of Progress and Partnerships

Photos and Story by Rick Hiduk

Wyoming County commissioner Judy Mead (right) was thanked for her years of service to the EMHR board as the official government representative of the county. Mead helped with the formation in the organization in 1998. Leslie Cadden (left) presented Mead with a citation from Rep. Karen Boback.

Board members and staff of the Endless Mountains Heritage Region (EMHR) met on Oct. 4 at American Legion Post 510 in Black Walnut, Laceyville, where they were joined by associate members, project partners and other guests for their annual meeting.

EMHR executive director Cain Chamberlin thanked members of the Kitson Arts Alliance in attendance for helping to make the Bradford County Summer Parks series a success by coordinating entertainment. Other well-received endeavors in 2019 included the annual Youth Heritage Sojourn and the Rivers of Our Region presentations in Tunkhannock, Montrose and Dushore.

In addition to conducting a parks and trails series in Sullivan County in 2020, the EMHR will prepare a special purpose study and meet with farm bureaus in its four-county region. “A lot of our agricultural initiatives had fallen by the wayside,” Chamberlin remarked, “and we want to get back into that.”

Representatives of organizations that have benefited from the EMHR’s annual mini-grant program took turns providing updates on what they have accomplished with their respective funding, including Rail-Trail Council project manager Lynn Conrad; Elaine Poost of the Bradford County Regional Arts Council; Bradford County Historical Society Museum curator Matt Carl; Bill Brasington, director of interactive learning for the Troy Historical Society; Erica Rogler, executive director of the Wyoming County Cultural Center; Tunkhannock artist Bob Lizza; Keystone College grants director Liz Ratchford; and Candace Sturdevant of the PA Route 6 Alliance. PP Bliss Gospel Songwriters Museum board president Wendy Carrington sent a report on progress at their site in Orwell Township.

Speakers at the annual Endless Mountains Heritage Region members meeting and luncheon included (top, from left) Matt Carl of the Bradford County Historical Society, Liz Ratchford of Keystone College, Lynn Conrad of the Rail-Trails Council, Candace Sturdevant of PA Route 6 Alliance, Elaine Poost of the Bradford County Regional Arts Council, Erica Rogler of the Wyoming County Cultural Center, and Bill Brasington of the Troy Historical Society. Above, EMHR executive director Cain Chamberlin (center) thanks Melanie (left) and Wylie Norton of Sullivan County for their many years of service to organization as board members.

Poost shared her excitement about a new program series for preschool children that focuses on nature and the outdoors. Classes have begun at the Stohl Nature Center in Wysox and will branch out from there. EMHR funding will also be used to enhance the Wyalusing Community Core Trail Project with interpretive signage, she noted.

Rogler is overseeing Lizza’s production of 35 four-by-sixty-inch hand-painted panels depicting the Nicholson Bridge as it looked about 100 years ago that will be applied to the south exterior wall of the Wyoming County Cultural Center beginning late October.

Sturdevant was key speaker for the event, providing an update on the Route 6 Façade & Signage Program, for which her organization hopes to procure $133,000 from the PA DCNR specifically for Bradford and Wyoming counties.

In addition to business and property owners, municipal governments are also eligible for the $5,000 grants, which require a 100 percent match. The program was developed by the PA Route 6 Alliance for adaptive reuse of additional structures, bringing substandard buildings up to code, and simply giving others a face-lift to enhance commercial development and foster community pride.

New EMHR officers elected for 2020 include Kevin Abrams of Bradford County, who will serve as the new president; Rogler of Wyoming County, who will remain vice president; and Chris Brown, who replaces Joyce Kerrick as secretary/treasurer.

Interested readers may contact the Endless Mountains Heritage Region for more information on programs and grants at 570-265-1528 or log on to www.EMHeritage.org.

North Branch Performing Arts Guide

A Sampling of Performing Arts Venues & Organizations Throughout Our Region

REGION 1 – Tunkhannock area
REGION 2 – Wyalusing area
REGION 3 – Towanda area
REGION 4 – The Penn-York Valley (Waverly, Sayre, Athens area)
REGION 5 – Owego area
REGION 6 – Binghamton area
REGION 7 – Montrose area
REGION 8 – Viaduct Valley (Susquehanna Depot, Lenox, Nicholson area)
REGION 9 – Scranton area
REGION 10 – Wilkes-Barre area

 

REGIONS 1 & 2

 

DIETRICH THEATER
60 East Tioga Street,
Tunkhannock, PA 18657
570-836-1022
dietrichtheater.com

 

REGIONS 3 & 4

 

KEYSTONE THEATRE
601 Main Street,
Towanda, PA 18848
570-268-2787
bradfordcountymovies.com/keystone-theatre

 

RIALTO THEATRE
5 E. Main Street,
Canton, PA 17724
570-673-4444
bradfordcountymovies.com/rialto-theatre

 

SAYRE THEATRE
205 S. Elmer Avenue,
Sayre, PA 18840
570-882-9000
bradfordcountymovies.com/sayre-theatre

 

WINDING RIVER PLAYERS
415 Main Street,
Towanda, PA 18848
570-268-0481
wrplayers.org

 

REGIONS 5 & 6

 

ANDERSON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
Binghamton University
Parkway East,
Vestal, NY 13850
607-777-6802
binghamton.edu/anderson-center

 

BINGHAMTON PHILHARMONIC
71 State Street,
Binghamton, NY 13901
607-723-3931
binghamtonphilharmonic.org

 

BROADWAY IN BINGHAMTON
Broadway Theatre League
18 Riverside Drive,
Binghamton, NY
607-772-1391
nacentertainment.com/broadway-in-binghamton

 

BROOME COUNTY FORUM THEATRE & MAINES ARENA
236 Washington Street,
Binghamton, NY 13901
607-778-1528
broomearenadorum.com

 

REGIONS 5 & 6, continued

 

ENDICOTT PERFORMING ARTS CENTER
102 Washington Avenue,
Endicott, NY 13760
607-785-8903
endicottarts.com

 

THE GOODWILL THEATRE
67 Broad Street,
Johnson City, NY 13790
607-772-2404
goodwilltheatre.net

 

THE KNOW THEATRE
74 Carroll Street,
Binghamton, NY 13901
607-724-4341
knowtheatre.org

 

SCHORR FAMILY FIREHOUSE STAGE
Goodwill Theatre Performing Arts Complex,
48 Willow Street,
Johnson City, NY 13790
607-772-2404, ext 301
goodwilltheatre.net/venues/schorr-family-firehouse-stage

 

SUNY BROOME THEATER AT BROOME COMMUNITY COLLEGE
607-778-5000
sunybroome.edu/theater

 

TI-AHWAGA COMMUNITY PLAYERS & PERFORMING ARTS CENTER
42 Delphine Street,
Owego, NY 13827
607-687-2130
tiahwaga.com

 

TRI-CITIES OPERA
315 Clinton Street,
Binghamton, NY 13905
607-729-3444
tricitiesopera.com

 

REGIONS 7 & 8

 

ENDLESS MOUNTAINS THEATRE COMPANY
New Milford, PA
570-335-7104
endlessmountainstheatre.org

 

MONTROSE THEATRE
38 Public Avenue,
Montrose, PA 18801
570-278-3352
montrosemovietheater.com

 

REGIONS 7 & 8, continued

 

NORTHERN TIER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
570-289-1090
northerntiersymphony.org

 

REGIONS 9 & 10

 

BALLET THEATRE OF SCRANTON
310 Penn Avenue,
Scranton, PA 18503
570-347-2867
balletscranton.org

 

BROADWAY IN SCRANTON
Broadway Theatre League of Northeastern Pennsylvania
345 North Washington Avenue,
Scranton, PA 18503
570-342-7784
nacentertainment.com/broadway-in-scranton

 

CHORAL SOCIETY OF NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA
choralsociety.net

 

THE F.M. KIRBY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
71 Public Square,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
570-826-1100
kirbycenter.org

 

NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA PHILHARMONIC
570-270-4444
nepaphil.org

 

SCRANTON CULTURAL CENTER AT THE MASONIC TEMPLE
420 North Washington Avenue,
Scranton, PA 18503
570-346-7369
scrantonculturalcenter.org

 

THE SCRANTON PUBLIC THEATRE
126 West Market Street,
Scranton, PA 18508
570-344-3656
scrantonpublictheatre.com

 

 

North Branch Guide to Wineries & Breweries

A Sampling of Wineries, Breweries, Cideries & Distilleries Throughout Our Region

REGION 1 – Tunkhannock area
REGION 2 – Wyalusing area
REGION 3 – Towanda area
REGION 4 – The Penn-York Valley (Waverly, Sayre, Athens area)
REGION 5 – Owego area
REGION 6 – Binghamton area
REGION 7 – Montrose area
REGION 8 – Viaduct Valley (Susquehanna Depot, Lenox, Nicholson area)
REGION 9 – Scranton area
REGION 10 – Wilkes-Barre area

 

REGIONS 1 & 2

 

DEEP ROOTS HARD CIDER
348 Back Road,
Sugar Run, PA 18846
570-746-1668
deeprootshc.com

 

GROVEDALE WINERY & VINEYARDS
71 Grovedale Lane,
Wyalusing, PA 18853
570-746-1400
grovedalewinery.com

 

NIMBLE HILL BREWING COMPANY
3971 US-6,
Tunkhannock, PA 18657
570-836-9463
nimblehillbrewing.com

 

NIMBLE HILL VINEYARD & WINERY
3971 US-6,
Tunkhannock, PA 18657
570-836-9463
nimblehillbrewing.com

 

REGIONS 3 & 4

 

ANTLER RIDGE WINERY – ROME
37 Antler Ridge Lane,
Ulster, PA 18850
570-247-7222
antlerridgewinery.com

 

BLUESTONE BREWING COMPANY
18 Pitney Street,
South Waverly, PA 18840
570-731-0222
bluestonebrewingcompany.com

 

D&D BREW WORKS
4741 US-220,
Muncy Valley, PA 17758
570-946-7979

 

DIVERSION BREWING CO.
729 Wyncoop Creek Road,
Chemung, NY 14825
607-542-9168
diversionbrewing.com

 

EVE’S CIDERY
308 Beckhorn Hollow Road,
Van Etten, NY 14889
607-229-0230
evescidery.com

 

HORSEHEADS BREWING
250 Old Ithaca Road,
Horseheads, NY 14845
607-739-8468
horseheadsbrewing.com

 

LOPEZ WINERY & VINEYARD
44 Winery Road,
Lopez, PA 18628
570-928-7897

 

OREGON HILL WINERY
840 Oregon Hill Road,
Morris, PA 16938
570-353-2711
oregonhillwinery.com

 

PAPPY JACK’S WINERY
109 Old Sullivan Road,
Hillsgrove, PA
570-924-3826

 

PICKERING WINERY – WYSOX
27697 PA-187,
Wysox, PA 18854
570-247-7269
pickeringwinery.webs.com

 

STAGGERING UNICORN WINERY
10952 North Rome Road,
Athens, PA 18810
570-888-7070
staggeringunicorn.com

 

STONEYRIDGE ORCHARD & WINERY
160 Bixby Road,
Erin, NY 14838
607-796-9842
stoneyridgeorchard.com

 

TIMBER RIDGE WINERY
722 Graham Road,
Canton, PA 17724
570-673-4234

 

UPSTATE BREWING COMPANY
3028 Lake Road,
Elmira, NY 14903
607-742-2750
upstatebrewing.com

 

WELLSBORO HOUSE RESTAURANT & BREWERY
34 Charleston Street,
Wellsboro, PA 16901
570-723-4687
thewellsborohouse.com

REGIONS 3 & 4, continued

 

WINTERLAND WINERY
8028 US-220,
Dushore, PA 18614
570-314-4077

 

YORKHOLO BREWING
19 N Main Street,
Mansfield, PA 16933
570-662-0241
yorkholobrewing.com

 

REGIONS 5 & 6

 

BEER TREE BREW CO.
197 NY-369,
Port Crane, NY 13833
beertreebrew.com

 

BINGHAMTON BREWING COMPANY
15 Avenue B,
Johnson City, NY 13790
607-238-3448
bingbrew.com

 

BLACK BEAR FARM WINERY
248 County Road 1,
Chenango Forks, NY 13746
607-656-9863
blackbearwinery.com

 

THE FARMHOUSE BREWERY
17 Lake Street,
Owego, NY 13827
607-227-2676
thefarmhousebrewery.com

 

FRENCH DISTILLERS & ALCHEMISTS
10 Walker Avenue,
Lisle, NY 13797
607-227-5094

 

GALAXY BREWING COMPANY
41 Court Street,
Binghamton, NY 13901
607-217-4815
galaxybrewingco.com

 

GLEN PARK VINEYARDS
633 Allen Glen Road,
Owego, NY 13827
607-687-3150
glenparkvineyards.com

 

LONE MAPLE FARM
2001 Hawleyton Road,
Binghamton, NY 13903
607-724-6877
lonemaplefarm.com

 

THE NORTH BREWERY
110 Washington Avenue,
Endicott, NY 13760
607-785-0524
northbrewery.com

 

WATER STREET BREWING CO.
168 Water Street,
Binghamton, NY 13901
607-217-4546
waterstreetbrewingco.com

 

REGIONS 7 & 8

 

2 DOGZ & A GUY BREWING AT RED ROCK
33288 PA-171,
Susquehanna, PA 18847
570-860-6066
eatredrockbbq.com

 

ENDLESS BREWING
20610 PA-29,
Montrose, PA 18801
570-967-0985
endlessbrewing.com

 

HIDDEN CREEK VINEYARD & WINERY
1670 Carter Road,
Laceyville, PA 18623
570-869-WINE
hiddencreekwines.com

 

SAINT JOE WINERY
889 Johnson Road,
Friendsville, PA 18818
570-553-4339

 

REGIONS 9 & 10

 

BARTOLAI WINERY
2377 PA-92,
Harding, PA 18643
570-388-8466
bartolaiwinery.com

 

BENNY BREWING COMPANY
1429 Sans Souci Parkway,
Hanover Twp, PA 18706
570-735-7028
bennybrewing.com

REGIONS 9 & 10, continued

 

BREAKER BREWING COMPANY
787 E Northampton Street,
Wilkes-Barre Twp, PA 18702
570-392-9078
breakerbrewingcompany.com

 

CAPRA COLLINA WINERY
1971 Scranton Carbondale Highway,
Blakely, PA 18508
570-489-0489
capracollinawinery.com

 

CASE QUATTRO WINERY
1542 Main Street,
Peckville, PA 18452
570-382-3855

 

CONYNGHAM BREWING COMPANY
309 S Main Street,
Conyngham, PA 18219
570-710-5752
conynghambrewing.com

 

LANG BEVERAGE COMPANY
128 Lee Mine Street,
Nanticoke, PA 18634
570-592-5937
langbeverage.org

 

LINDEN TREE WINERY
506 S Main Street,
Pittston, PA 18640

 

LUCCHI FAMILY WINE CELLARS
134 N Main Avenue,
Scranton, PA 18504
570-334-7576
lucchifamilywinecellars.com

 

MAIOLATESI WINE CELLARS – MAYFIELD
WSK Plaza
504 Scranton Carbondale Highway,
Mayfield, PA 18433
570-876-3275
maiolatesiwinecellars.com

 

MAIOLATESI WINE CELLARS – SCOTT TWP
32 Cabernet Drive,
Olyphant, PA 18447
570-254-9977
maiolatesiwinecellars.com

 

MALACARI WINERY, PRODUCE & DELI
80 Wilkes-Barre Twp Boulevard,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570-262-8683

 

MARILAKE WINERY
209 Main Street,
Childs, PA 18407
570-536-6575
marilakewinery.com

 

MARZONI’S BRICK OVEN & BREWING CO.
26 Montage Mountain Road,
Moosic, PA 18507
570-342-7027
marzonis.com

 

MUCCIOLO FAMILY WINES
1228 S Main Street,
Old Forge, PA
570-766-7071
muccwines.com

 

NORTH SLOPE BREWING COMPANY
33 Tunkhannock Highway,
Dallas, PA 18612
570-255-4012
northslopebrewing.com

 

PISANO FAMILY WINERY
3700 PA-118,
Dallas, PA 18612
570-817-4168

 

SUSQUEHANNA BREWING COMPANY
635 S Main Street,
Pittston, PA 18640
570-654-3557
sbcbeer.com

 

THREE (III) PONDS WINERY
26 Franklin Valley Road,
Dalton, PA 18414
570-563-5080
iiipondswinery.com

 

VITO’S WINE CELLAR
3 May St,
Pittston, PA
570-299-2069
vitoswinecellar.com

 

WOOD WINERY
3491 Hornbaker Cemetery Road,
Madison Twp, PA 18444
570-842- 6720
woodwines.com